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Dr. Google isn’t the colleague you’d like it to be

In Featured, Opinion by Shahbaz SyedLeave a Comment

“Well, I looked up my symptoms on Google, and it said I was having a heart attack”, we’ve all had this patient interaction before. We live in an era where information is so freely and easily accessible. The danger comes in determining the intrinsic accuracy of data. An recent study has suggested that researching symptoms online is more likely to make one feel worse, and less informed. While this is of no surprise to …

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A lesson on blood and bullets for Rick Santorum

In Featured, Opinion by Blair BighamLeave a Comment

Rick Santorum is clearly in need of a biology lesson following his puzzling assertion that the youth who filled Washington’s streets in protest of America’s infamously lax gun laws would have better spent their time learning cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), in case a shooting were to occur in their high school. “How about kids instead of looking to someone else to solve their problem, do something about maybe taking CPR classes or trying to …

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Narrative Medicine and Resilience in Emergency Medicine

In Opinion by Sarah Luckett-GatopoulosLeave a Comment

How do we treat suffering? It’s simple enough to trawl the depths of wisdom collected in Rosen’s. Journal clubs, podcasts, and blogs keep us abreast of the latest updates to evidence-based practice. There is no substitute for the experience gained on clinical shifts. Reading around cases we see in the Emergency Department helps. We may struggle to memorize every list, table, and pathway, but the material itself is pretty straightforward. It’s all laid …

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Tramadol? Think of it more as ‘Tramadont’

In Featured, Opinion by Shahbaz Syed1 Comment

Ok, I’ll concede that title is pretty bad, but I felt my usual name for Tramadol (Tramacrap), just didn’t seem as appropriate for a headline. Dad jokes aside, Tramadol is a synthetic opioid that entered the Canadian market in 2005, and has seen widespread uptake and use. Unfortunately, Tramadol has not been the miracle drug that we anticipated it would be, as is fraught with harms. Alarmingly, despite a host of problems associated …

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Anxiety: Why are we seeing so much of it?

In Featured, Opinion by Shahbaz Syed1 Comment

Our early evolutionary ancestors relied on the fight or flight response to help ensure their survival and ability to propagate their genes. It was this successful trait that helped allow for the evolution and survival of our species to date. However, as we will discuss, the evolutionary and ecological history of this trait is perhaps an significant culprit in the increasing prevalence of anxiety related disorders that we are current witnessing. Evolutionary History …

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“Patient Satisfaction” – it’s bad for everyone

In Editorial, Featured, Opinion by Shahbaz Syed5 Comments

Higher patient satisfaction scores are linked to increased health care costs, and higher mortality1. Pause. Take a second, and re-read that last sentence. The follow up question is obvious – why would administrators push patient satisfaction if it results in worse outcomes? This post seeks to delve into the harms of targeting patient satisfaction, why it appears to be done, and the importance of speaking to our administrators in order to advocate on …