View Post

A Medical Student’s Perspective on CBME

In Editorial, Education & Quality Improvement, Featured, Opinion by Verdah Bismah1 Comment

As programs across the country transition to a form of competency-based medical education (CBME) we will be hosting a series of posts from the many people this transition will affect. Our first perspective is that of a medical student faced with a CBME filled future! Verdah Bismah is a medical student at Queen’s University, which is transitioning all of it’s postgraduate programs to CBME in 2017. If you are a medical student please feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below. If you are an educator we want to hear from you too!

View Post

Resource utilization: why do we overdo it?

In Editorial, Opinion by Shahbaz Syed0 Comments

There is a plethora of evidence that suggests, as physicians we over-diagnose, over-treat and over-investigate illness, often with little benefit to patients. The idea of rationale resource utilization is beginning to gain momentum, with campaigns such as Choosing Wisely, advocating for physicians to use the best evidence available in their practice. In order to appreciate inappropriate resource utilization, physicians first need to be aware of why they’re over-investigating and any inherent biases they may have, …

View Post

Beyond Medical Education: SoMe in Disasters

In Commentary, Featured, Opinion by Edmund Kwok3 Comments

In the world of medicine, Social Media (SoMe) has arguably made the greatest impact in medical education. What started as scattered simple blog posts on random topics of interest by keen individuals, movements like FOAMed have evolved over the past few years with establishment of robust frameworks for dissemination and active discussion around medical topics (for more details have a look here and here). But is there more to SoMe beyond medical education? Information …

View Post

Medical Coaching: Don Miguel Ruiz’s “Four Agreements”

In Commentary, Featured, Opinion by Nadim Lalani0 Comments

In medicine and medical education, we’re often hyper-focused on medical content, rather than the art of medicine. I recently finished reading Don Miguel Ruiz’s book “The Four Agreements“1, and identified some excellent educational pearls for medical students, residents and practicing physicians; pertaining to self-awareness and belief systems. In his book (albeit with a rather religious theme) Ruiz walks the reader through what he calls the Four Agreements – contracts to make with oneself in order to …

View Post

Email Etiquette: Thou Shalt Not CC Everybody

In Commentary, Opinion by Nadim Lalani2 Comments

I was reflecting on a recent conversation with my sister-in-law about someone who sent a farewell email to her entire company. We debated the appropriateness of this, and email etiquette in general. It made me think of stupid things that I have done with email. I thought that I’d share. Ever hit “reply all” by accident and sent a message disparaging someone? √ CHECK – This goes down as one of the most …

View Post

Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) in the ED: Implications for EM Practice

In Editorial, Featured, Opinion by Francis Bakewell0 Comments

After an excellent introduction to Medical Assistance in Dying, and its potential impact upon the Healthcare System, Dr. Francis Bakewell takes a further look at potential implications and ramifications within the Emergency Department (ED).  Last week, after much review and attempts at amendment by the Senate, the federal government’s legislation on Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) received royal assent and became law. Bill C14 allows for aid in dying, either through prescription of lethal …