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Applications Open! CanadiEM Digital Scholar Fellowship 2023 -2024

In Commentary by Blair BighamLeave a Comment

We’re now accepting applications for 2023-2024. Fellowships are 6-18 months long withflexible start time and pace. Applications are accepted throughout the year. The deadline is May 1, 2023 for a start date of July 1, 2023. WHY should you do it? The Digital Scholar Fellowship, a remote, variably-paced, flexible curriculum and mentoredproject, might be for you! You’ll explore our specialized online curricula by modules – core and elective – to build digitalscholarship capacity …

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Tiny Tips: BRADIE for Differential Causes of Bradycardia

In Tiny Tips by Isaac KimLeave a Comment

Bradycardia is a very common finding in patients presenting to the emergency department. In 2018, over 18,000 pacemakers were inserted in Canada alone for severe dysrhythmia management.​1​ However, there are many causes of bradycardia that exist. Knowing and identifying the underlying causes of bradycardias is critical to emergency department management and disposition. The following mnemonic, BRADIE, is a helpful tool for remembering various causes of bradycardia during the clinical assessment of these patients. …

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Clinical Question: How does the sensitivity/specificity of lung ultrasound compare to plain films in diagnosing acute decompensated heart failure?

In Clinical Questions by Neil SenguptaLeave a Comment

A 64 year old woman presents to the emergency department with dyspnea.  On exam she is mildly tachypneic, has an oxygen saturation of 94% on 2L nasal prongs, and bilateral crackles to auscultation.  You suspect acute heart failure and wonder about the role of lung ultrasound as you await her chest x-ray.   Clinical question: What is the sensitivity and specificity of lung PoCUS compared to chest radiograph for diagnosis of acute decompensated …

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Clinical Question: Can stable patients presenting to the emergency department with blunt abdominal trauma be managed safely without a CT scan?

In Clinical Questions by Kylie SuwaryLeave a Comment

You are working in a rural Emergency Department (ED). You assess a 25-year-old male patient who crashed his car into a tree. Vitals are normal and GCS is 15. Airway is patent and protected. There is bilateral chest rise, no abdominal tenderness or seatbelt sign. Pelvis is stable, and you notice some swelling over his right wrist. What is Blunt Abdominal Trauma? Blunt abdominal trauma is an injury to the abdomen without an …