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Professionals should dress professionally

In Editorial, Opinion by Edmund Kwok14 Comments

What would you prefer your doctor to be wearing when examining and treating you or your loved ones? Most would likely reply with something along the lines of “it doesn’t really matter, as long as they are competent and do a good job“. Except it does matter, apparently. So much so that there have been hospital/nation-wide policies surrounding the issue, and a recent surge in publications studying this phenomenon – some of them hinting …

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Competency Based Medical Education (CBME): What is it?

In Editorial, Opinion by Shahbaz Syed2 Comments

If I had a dollar for every time somebody mentioned Competency Based Medical Education (CBME), I could forget about the Royal College exam next year, and find a nice island to settle down on. Since nobody seems willing to contribute to my retirement fund, I am instead left wondering what CBME really is. It seemingly has become a buzz word amongst the medical education community, but many outside of this bubble (including myself) …

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Counterpoint: Talking about service and education

In Counterpoint, Opinion by Kaif Pardhan0 Comments

As we continue to develop educational models within medicine, old paradigms need to be examined and discussed. In a recent post on the ICENet Blog, Dr. Lynfa Stroud discussed perceptions on service and education in residency training programs. Dr. Kaif Pardhan (@kaifpardhan), a staff Emergency Physician at the University of Toronto, and recent FRCP graduate, provides an counterpoint and some further considerations to Dr. Stroud’s arguments. Service and Education: Two separate issues? Dr. Stroud raises an interesting point as it relates to service …

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Anecdotal evidence: what’s the harm?

In Editorial, Opinion by Shahbaz Syed5 Comments

Anecdotal evidence is data garnered from stories or experiences. In a medical context it is often based on one (or more) patient interactions [1]. After seeing a rare disease, or missing a potentially dangerous diagnosis, we are naturally inclined to over-investigate that entity, regardless of what the evidence would suggest we do.

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Waves of FOAM: Does the discussion of quality and impact suggest #FOAMed’s maturation?

In Commentary, Counterpoint, Featured by Teresa Chan6 Comments

The founders of the Free Open Access Meducation (FOAM; #FOAMed) have described the phenomena as a movement. Historically, social movements have come in multiple waves. Feminism, for instance, is thought by many scholars to have at least 3 waves (some would argue 4), each with its own characteristics and stance on how to achieve its ends. If FOAM is a movement, it is likely to have similar waves of FOAMites with variable perspectives …