View Post

CPR Update Series Part 4 – Minimizing interruptions in chest compressions

In Medical Concepts by Stuart NethertonLeave a Comment

Editor’s note: This post marks the fourth in a series of posts outlining the evidence surrounding various aspects of CPR by Dr. Stu Netherton. Follow along as he covers Rate of Compression, Depth of Compression, Chest Wall Recoil, Minimizing Interruptions, and Avoiding Excessive Ventilation. Part 4 – Minimizing interruptions in chest compressions As providers we understand that the reason to perform chest compressions to artificially make the heart beat, delivering oxygen to and …

View Post

CPR Update Series – Part 3 Chest Wall Recoil

In Medical Concepts by Stuart NethertonLeave a Comment

Editor’s note: This post marks the third in a series of posts outlining the evidence surrounding various aspects of CPR by Dr. Stu Netherton. Follow along as he covers Rate of Compression, Depth of Compression, Chest Wall Recoil, Minimizing Interruptions, and Avoiding Excessive Ventilation. Part 3 – Chest Wall Recoil The third component of high quality CPR is to allow full chest wall recoil. The 2015 guideline states: “It is reasonable for rescuers …

View Post

Evidence Bite: Medical Education and caring for transgender patients

In Medical Concepts by Alexandre CoutinLeave a Comment

Transgender (trans) people make up 0.6% of the population1, yet are among the most underserved in health care.2–5 Barriers to accessing care have been linked to unsafe surgical practices, self-prescribed hormone therapy, and even in the high rate of suicidality among trans Ontarians.6–10 Just over half of trans people report having negative Emergency Department (ED) experiences specifically related to their identity, while one fifth avoid the ED altogether out of fear of discrimination, suboptimal care, …

View Post

New Oncologic Therapies Mean New Oncologic Emergencies: An Approach to Immunotherapy-Related Adverse Events

In Case Series, Medical Concepts by Arden AzimLeave a Comment

A 63-year-old man, Andrew, presents to the emergency department with a several-day history of worsening diarrhea. He has abdominal pain rated 6/10, has been having over 8 loose stools per day for 4 days, and tells you he has seen some blood and mucus in his stools. He denies any nausea, vomiting, fevers or chills, sick contacts or recent travel. However, he tells you that he is under-going active treatment for Stage IV …

View Post

Sirens to Scrubs: Acute Coronary Syndromes, Part Two – To the Lab!

In Sirens to Scrubs, Working in EM by Richard ArmourLeave a Comment

Disclaimer: The procedures and therapies discussed in this post are extrapolated from a number of ambulance services globally. This does not replace the direction of readers’ ambulance service clinical guidelines or protocols and should not be used in place of local guidelines or protocols. If you believe something in this post would benefit your ambulance service, contact your local medical director(s) before altering your own practice.  In Part One of this series our …