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Sirens to Scrubs: Acute Coronary Syndromes, Part Two – To the Lab!

In Sirens to Scrubs, Working in EM by Richard ArmourLeave a Comment

Disclaimer: The procedures and therapies discussed in this post are extrapolated from a number of ambulance services globally. This does not replace the direction of readers’ ambulance service clinical guidelines or protocols and should not be used in place of local guidelines or protocols. If you believe something in this post would benefit your ambulance service, contact your local medical director(s) before altering your own practice.  In Part One of this series our …

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Sirens to Scrubs: Acute Coronary Syndromes, Part One – Beyond Door-to-Balloon

In Sirens to Scrubs, Working in EM by Richard ArmourLeave a Comment

Emergency Medical Services receives a 9-1-1 call for a 52-year-old female suffering with chest pain. As Paramedics rush to the scene, they discuss the physiology of Acute Coronary Syndromes…  About Sirens to Scrubs Sirens to Scrubs was created with the goal of helping to bridge the disconnect between pre-hospital and in-hospital care of emergency patients. The series offers in-hospital providers a glimpse into the challenges and scope of practice of out-of-hospital care while …

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Sirens to Scrubs: Esophageal Foreign Body Obstructions

In Sirens to Scrubs, Working in EM by Paula Sneath1 Comment

You respond lights and sirens to a popular lunch spot near the provincial legislature for a man choking. You find 56-year-old Jeff clutching at his chest, struggling to breathe and looking very panicked. Around him are dozens of other patrons looking equally panicked, uncertain of what to do. After performing a primary survey on Jeff and assisting him to your stretcher, your partner, who had been at the table talking to Jeff’s wife, …

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Sirens to Scrubs: Minor Head Injury

In Sirens to Scrubs, Working in EM by Paula SneathLeave a Comment

Paramedics are called to a skating rink, where a 45y/o female patient, Judy, has slipped on ice and struck her head. When they arrive, they find her sitting on a bench, alert and oriented with a GCS of 15. She is able to recall the events immediately leading up to the incident, and witnesses report a 30s loss of consciousness with no seizure activity. She has vomited once and continues to feel nauseated. …

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Introducing ‘Sirens to Scrubs’

In Sirens to Scrubs, Working in EM by Paula SneathLeave a Comment

Links to Sirens to Scrubs Posts Minor head injury (July 17, 2018) Esophageal foreign body obstructions (August 14, 2018) Acute coronary syndromes, Part one – Beyond Door-to-Balloon (September 27, 2018) Acute coronary syndromes, Part two – To the Lab! (October 25, 2018)   Are you a paramedic or other first responder that has wondered ‘what tests will my patient get’, or ‘how is a shoulder dislocation reduced’? Are you a member of the Emergency …

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“30 minutes? That’s enough to stay well” | Emergency Medicine Wellness Week

In Education & Quality Improvement, Featured, Mentorship, Working in EM by Zafrina PoonjaLeave a Comment

A typical day in the life of an Emergency Medicine physician: You wake up without an alarm after eight hours of undisturbed sleep. You enjoy a fresh cup of french press coffee while reading the morning news on your smartphone – along with a freshly baked croissant of course! Then you go to an hour long yoga session followed by a relaxing massage. Finally, you meet your friends for lunch at a local …