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FLOW Hacks 8 – In & out of the ED for the ‘Treat & Release’ patient.

In Education & Quality Improvement, Featured, FLOW Hacks by Sachin TrivediLeave a Comment

To continue our FLOW Hacks series, Victoria Woolner (NP, MN, MSc QIPS) writes about her team’s project tackling the ‘Treat and Release‘ patient. Setting This intervention was carried out at Toronto General and Toronto Western Hospital (UHN) in Toronto, Ontario. Between the two sites, there are approximately 117, 000 visits per year. Description of the innovation Treat & release (T&R) patients are patients that have been seen in the ED and asked to return …

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CAEP FEI | The Nursing Shift: Inter-Professional Education for Medical Students

In Featured, Featured Education Innovations (FEI) by Skye CrawfordLeave a Comment

Amy is a fourth year emergency medicine resident, who has recently started supervising medical students while on shift. She meets Jim, a third year medical student, who will be working with her for the shift. Over the course of the shift, it becomes apparent that Jim is struggling with understanding a charge nurse’s role in the emergency department. Amy wishes there was a way for medical students like Jim to gain more insight …

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CPR Update Series Part 4 – Minimizing interruptions in chest compressions

In Medical Concepts by Stuart NethertonLeave a Comment

Editor’s note: This post marks the fourth in a series of posts outlining the evidence surrounding various aspects of CPR by Dr. Stu Netherton. Follow along as he covers Rate of Compression, Depth of Compression, Chest Wall Recoil, Minimizing Interruptions, and Avoiding Excessive Ventilation. Part 4 – Minimizing interruptions in chest compressions As providers we understand that the reason to perform chest compressions to artificially make the heart beat, delivering oxygen to and …

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CPR Update Series – Part 3 Chest Wall Recoil

In Medical Concepts by Stuart NethertonLeave a Comment

Editor’s note: This post marks the third in a series of posts outlining the evidence surrounding various aspects of CPR by Dr. Stu Netherton. Follow along as he covers Rate of Compression, Depth of Compression, Chest Wall Recoil, Minimizing Interruptions, and Avoiding Excessive Ventilation. Part 3 – Chest Wall Recoil The third component of high quality CPR is to allow full chest wall recoil. The 2015 guideline states: “It is reasonable for rescuers …