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Sirens to Scrubs: Fever-Phobia

In Sirens to Scrubs, Working in EM by Paula Sneath2 Comments

You’re transporting Milly, a 68y/o healthy woman to the hospital with a fever of 38.9C with a productive cough. As you offload her she asks for a blanket, so you ask your student to get her one while you start your paperwork. Your student, Vincent, later tells you that he was taught at school not to give blankets to febrile patients and asks you about your reasoning for giving one to Milly. About …

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CAEP FEI | GridlockED: An Emergency Medicine Game and Teaching Tool

In Featured, Featured Education Innovations (FEI) by Paula SneathLeave a Comment

Ken is a second year Emergency Medicine resident who just received the following feedback from his attending: “The shift went well, but as you continue in your training, it is important to think about the flow of the department”. Ken acknowledges that managing the department is something he needs to learn, but he wishes there was a way he could practice his department flow skills even as a junior resident.  This Feature Educational …

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Sirens to Scrubs: Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

In Medical Concepts, Sirens to Scrubs by Paula Sneath2 Comments

You are dispatched to Jasmine, a 31yo patient, for palpitations. On arrival, you find her clinically stable in a narrow-complex, regular tachycardia at a rate of 180bpm. As you begin to coach her through vagal maneuvers and reach for your adenosine she advises you ‘I have something called Wolff-Parkinson-White – does that change anything?’ You think maybe it does, but you’re not sure. About Sirens to Scrubs Sirens to Scrubs was created with …

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Sirens to Scrubs: Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

In Sirens to Scrubs by Paula SneathLeave a Comment

You are dispatched lights and sirens for Jennifer, a 52-year-old female complaining of “the worst headache of my life”. She recalls running on a treadmill then feeling like she had been struck in the back of the head by a clap of thunder. She then proceeded to have a witnessed two-minute episode of syncope. On arrival you find Jennifer coming out of the bathroom where she was just vomiting. As you are getting …

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Sirens to Scrubs: Acute Coronary Syndromes, Part Four – Spot the Lesion!

In Medical Concepts, Sirens to Scrubs by Paula SneathLeave a Comment

In Part One of this series, we reviewed the pathophysiology of Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS), as well as some of the important features that should be elucidated on history-taking. In Part Two we discussed the current evidence-based practices for the management and transportation considerations in patients identified by paramedics to be suffering from a STEMI. In Part Three we described the series of events that occur when the care of a patient with …

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Sirens to Scrubs: Acute Coronary Syndromes, Part Three – Diagnosis and ED Management

In Sirens to Scrubs, Working in EM by Paula SneathLeave a Comment

In Part One of this series, we reviewed the pathophysiology of Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS), as well as some of the important features that should be elucidated on history-taking. In Part Two we discussed the current evidence-based practices for the management and transportation considerations in patients identified by paramedics to be suffering from a STEMI. In this third part, we will consider the series of events that occur when the care of a …