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Amazing and Awesome Rounds

In Education & Quality Improvement by Eve Purdy4 Comments

Editor’s note: This post was collaboratively written by the coordinators of Amazing & Awesome Rounds at Queen’s. Eve Purdy, Chris Meyer, and Elizabeth Blackmore.  You may have seen multiple postings on twitter and even an article in Annals of Emergency Medicine recently related to “Amazing and Awesome rounds.”1 A number of Canadian and international institutions are trying out this positive, spin on case reviews. At Queen’s University we have paired Amazing and Awesome (A&A) …

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#AnthroEve: An Intro to Anthropology and Medical Enculturation

In Commentary, Opinion by Eve Purdy6 Comments

I am becoming quite expert in navigating the look of confusion on my colleagues’ faces when I tell them that I am completing my master’s in anthropology. I can see behind their glazed eyes, in real time, the exotic mental images they are conjuring of the famous cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead or the comical similarities in social functioning between me and fictional physical anthropologist Temperance Brennan. A few remember that Paul Farmer is an anthropologist …

KT Evidence Bite: Cardioversion and Thromboembolism

In Knowledge Translation by Eve PurdyLeave a Comment

Editor’s note: This is a series based on work done by three physicians (Patrick Archambault, Tim Chaplin, and our BoringEM Managing editor Teresa Chan)  for the Canadian National Review Course (NRC). You can read a description of this course here. The NRC brings EM residents from across the Canada together in their final year for a crash course on everything emergency medicine. Since we are a specialty with heavy allegiance to the tenets of Evidence-Based Medicine, we thought we would serially release the biggest, …

KT Evidence Bite: Colchicine for Pericarditis

In Knowledge Translation by Eve PurdyLeave a Comment

Editor’s note: This is a series based on work done by three physicians (Patrick Archambault, Tim Chaplin, and our BoringEM Managing editor Teresa Chan)  for the Canadian National Review Course (NRC). You can read a description of this course here. The NRC brings EM residents from across the Canada together in their final year for a crash course on everything emergency medicine. Since we are a specialty with heavy allegiance to the tenets of Evidence-Based Medicine, we thought we would serially release the biggest, …